Posts

"The Graveyard Book" by Neil Gaiman

Image
Barns & Noble - $8.99 - $18.79

*LOCAL*Old Firehouse Books - $8.99

My close friend, who I met at our medical office job and is now also my editor and agent, let me borrow this book and promised  that I would love it.  She said it was right down my ally...and she was right!















๐Ÿ‘ Character Development
๐Ÿ‘ Story Progression
๐Ÿ‘ Writing Style

I finished it a couple weeks ago and just haven't gotten around to creating a review yet.  First of all, this book has some incredible illustrations by Dave McKean.  I found it quite nice, actually, to be going along with the story, getting intense with the reading, and suddenly there is a well-timed break in the tension to illustrate something that may have been a little difficult to imagine or a little more intriguing with the illustration than without it.

This adventurous story begins with an intriguing hook (which you can preview above).  A man quietly makes his way through the house, killing all of its occupants except one.  This one, barely a…

"Phasma" by Delilah S. Dawson

Image
Amazon: $9.99 - $21.37
Barnes & Noble: $7.94 - $30.27
Walmart: $21.37
*LOCAL*Firehouse Books: $28.99
Happy Sunday!  I finished reading "Phasma" a couple days ago, and had to let it sink in and germinate a little before I shared anything about it.  This was another Christmas gift from my wonderful boyfriend, who is a Star Wars addict, so this gift was really for both of us :)
๐Ÿ‘Character Development ๐Ÿ‘Story Progressoin ๐Ÿ‘Writing Style
This is the backstory of Captain Phasma, the silver storm trooper from the newest set of Star Wars movies.  She is from a brutal, back-water blanket called Parnassos.  She is a fierce warrior, and basically through out the story you see, several times over, that she is willing to do anything to not only survive, but to get ahead.  This is not the only part of the story, though.  Vi is a rebellion spy who is captured by Captain Cardinal, a red storm trooper who is hell-bent on finding evidence, and on Phasma, incriminating enough to get her capt…

"A Stranger in the House" by Shari Lapena

Image
Amazon
Barns & Noble
Old Firehouse Books (Local!!)

Happy new year, friends!  I've decided that writing a book review is a great way to start off the new year! :)  Of course, some of my resolutions include reading more, writing every day (whether in my novel, my journal, or blogging), and if you follow me on Goodreads, you can see that I've set my 2018 goal to 50 books!  What are some of your resolutions or goals?

๐Ÿ‘ Character development
๐Ÿ‘ Story progression
๐Ÿ‘ Writing style (third person, present tense)

I received this book from my amazing boyfriend for Christmas, and gave it a three thumbs up on Goodreads.  Without spoilers, let me tell you why.  The plot moved quickly, but didn't leave you feeling lost and confused, as if the author had left you in the dust.  As you read, the author gives you enough suspicion to pretty much know what's going on, but that's okay because I got really invested in the characters, their relationships, and I wanted to see how it was…

"In a Dark, Dark Wood" by Ruth Ware

Image
Amazon Barnes and Noble
I picked this one up spontaneously at Barnes and Noble with a gift card given to me by a friend.  As I've said in the past, I love bare, spindly trees, and that is why this one caught my eye.  I'd never heard of Ruth Ware before, but I have heard of her other book The Woman in Cabin 10, though I have never read it.  I figured I'd get this one, read it, and see how it goes before I read her others.
So, my first impression of this book was that it had an awesome cover, and it looked sinister.  However, when I went to read the little blurb that is typically on the back of a paperback book...it wasn't there! :(
I read it anyway and loved it.  The main character is a hermit and a writer, so of course I identified with her immediately.  Ruth Ware gives us several characters to keep track of, however she provides each of them with unique and defining qualities, so it's really not difficult to remember who they all are.  (This was a difficulty I ran …

"Reached" by Ally Condie (#3 of the Matched trilogy)

Image
Amazon Barns and Noble
So, I've started taking notes as I read these books.  Notes about what I like and don't like, and what I'm feeling about the characters and the story.  I stop and take notes whenever the urge hits me.  With Reached it ended up being about every 50-70 pages or so.
My over all feeling  about this book, and the series in general, is that it was worth reading, I'm glad I have the collection on my shelf, and it is definitely age appropriate as far as being young adult.
If you've read up on my previous reviews, you'll know that I fell in love with the series because of the first book, and was sorely disappointed by the second, to the point that I wasn't sure that I'd pick up the third one, but I'm glad I did.
I realized that I disliked the second book so much because it was ALL Cassia and Ky, there was no point of view from Xander, which is kind of cool to keep him mysterious for an entire book, but at the same time...it made the boo…

"The Emotional Craft of Fiction" by Donald Maass

Image
Kindle
Paperback

I'm seriously only fifty pages in, and I couldn't wait to share this with the world.  This book is incredibly insightful, structured well, and easy to follow.

I'm not usually a huge fan of self-help books, even when it comes to my writing, but I'm SO glad that the cover caught my eye at Barns and Noble.  This book was an impulse buy, and it was just one of those things that, when you see it, your soul says "yes, you need this."  It called to me.  I did judge it at first by its cover.  I love trees with spindly branches, so that was what made me look at it first.
And then the title.  The characters in my works-in-progress feel a lot of different, powerful emotions, but lately (thanks to my wonderful editor), it's been pointed out that I'm having issues showing vs. telling.

In addition to useful examples from popular literary works, the author goes into detail about what is important to the reader and why, and then at the end of each sec…

"Perfect Ruin" by Lauren DeStefano

Image
Kindle Hardcover Paperback Audiobook Audio CD
I picked this book up randomly at Barns and Noble because I liked the cover.  I bought it because I had a gift card.
I also finished reading this book last year some time, and for some reason just never posted a review.
I love it.  Love it love it...LOVE the idea of everything in it.  There is a peaceful society that lives in the sky when a series of arson takes place.  This is terrifying for these people, because they are peaceful.  Who, in their little bubble, would dare to hurt a fellow peaceful sky society member?
It focuses on the same thing that every young adult dystopian/Utopian novel does now days: a young woman.  She helps care for her older brother, who has PTSD and brain damage from trying to escape the society in the sky, and this first book in the series kind of outlines what this society is all about, their morals and a little bit of history.
I love the details and dynamics of the characters in this one, and the end is thrilling…

Contact Me! :)

Name

Email *

Message *